Saying Thanks

After a long weekend eating lots of turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving (or “Canadian Thanksgiving” as others may know it), I thought it would be appropriate to post a Thanksgiving-themed leadership tip.

“Thanks” is such a simple word.  A word that, at one syllable, literally takes less than a second to say.  But the impact of this word can be massive.  Coming from their leader, “thanks” can make employees feel appreciated, valued, and that their hard work is being recognized.  Employees who feel these things are more likely to continually perform high, are more likely to participate in extra-role activities that benefit the entire organization, and more likely to stick around a company longer.  But perhaps even more importantly, employees who receive gratitude are happier and healthier.  All for one small word.

So please, remember to show some appreciation for those who continually help you do your job 🙂

If you’re still not convinced, I’d like to quickly look at the other side – not saying thanks when it’s due.  In the field of leadership research, it was once thought that not saying thanks had no effect – of course the positive outcomes listed above wouldn’t occur, but could negative effects beyond that happen?

I’m writing about it, so obviously the answer is YES.  Not saying thanks, not giving someone recognition or praise when its due is actually a significant source of stress.  Think about it: If you had been working hard to deliver a project, to be met with no acknowledgement whatsoever, wouldn’t you be a bit peeved?  Of course.  And that’s what researchers found: A lack of feedback is a terrible thing to deal with.

Thanks (yes, that was intended) for taking the time to think about this small gesture that can truly make someone’s day.  Try it tomorrow 🙂

Further Reading: